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Health Condition

Athletic Performance

About This Condition

Aside from training, nutrition may be the most important influence on athletic performance.1 However, in seeking a competitive edge, athletes are often susceptible to fad diets or supplements that have not been scientifically validated. Nevertheless, there is much useful research to guide the exerciser toward optimum health and performance.

Other Therapies

Athletic performance may be improved by ensuring adequate and balanced nutrition, sufficient fluid intake, and proper rest. The avoidance of performance-reducing drugs such as alcohol and tobacco is also commonly recommended.

References

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