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Nutritional Supplement

Gotu Kola

Parts Used & Where Grown

This plant grows in a widespread distribution in tropical, swampy areas, including parts of India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Madagascar, and South Africa. It also grows in Eastern Europe. The roots and leaves are used medicinally.

How It Works

The primary active constituents of gotu kola are saponins (also called triterpenoids), which include asiaticoside, madecassoside and madasiatic acid.1 These saponins may prevent excessive scar formation by inhibiting the production of collagen (the material that makes up connective tissue) at the wound site. These constituents are also associated with promoting wound healing. One preliminary trial in humans found that a gotu kola extract improved healing of infected wounds (unless the infection had reached bone).2 Additionally, a review of French studies suggests that topical gotu kola can improve healing of burns and wounds.1 Clinical trials have also shown it can help those with chronic venous insufficiency4,5 Another trial found gotu kola extract helpful for preventing and treating enlarged scars (keloids).6

References

1. Kartnig T. Clinical applications of Centella asiatica (L) Urb. In Herbs, Spices, and Medicinal Plants: Recent Advances in Botany, Horticulture, and Pharmacology, vol. 3., Craker LE, Simon JE (eds). Phoenix, AZ: Oryx Press, 1986, 145-73.

2. Morisset R, Cote NG, Panisset JC, et al. Evaluation of the healing activity of hydrocotyle tincture in the treatment of wounds. Phytother Res 1987;1:117-21.

3. Brinkhaus B, Linder M, Schuppan D, Hahn EG. Chemical, pharmacological and clinical profile of the East Asian medical plant Centella asiatica. Phytomedicine 2000;7:427-48.

4. Pointel JP, Boccalon H, Cloarec M, et al. Titrated extract of Centella asiatica (TECA) in the treatment of venous insufficiency of the lower limbs. Angiology 1986;37:420-1.

5. Bossé JP, Papillon J, Frenette G, et al. Clinical study of a new antikeloid drug. Ann Plastic Surg 1979;3:13-21.

6. Morisset R, Cote NG, Panisset JC, et al. Evaluation of the healing activity of hydrocotyle tincture in the treatment of wounds. Phytother Res 1987;1:117-21.

7. Kartnig T. Clinical applications of Centella asiatica (L) Urb. In Herbs, Spices, and Medicinal Plants: Recent Advances in Botany, Horticulture, and Pharmacology, vol. 3., Craker LE, Simon JE (eds). Phoenix, AZ: Oryx Press, 1986, 145-73.

8. Bossé JP, Papillon J, Frenette G, et al. Clinical study of a new antikeloid drug. Ann Plastic Surg 1979;3:13-21.

9. Shukla A, Rasik AM, Dhawan BN. Asiaticoside-induced elevation of antioxidant levels during acute wound healing. Phytotherapy Res 1999;13:50-4.

10. Shukla A, Rasik AM, Jain GK, et al. In vitro and in vivo wound healing activity of asiaticoside isolated from Centella asiatica. J Ethnopharmacol 1999;65:1-11.

11. Marquart FX, Bellon G, Gillery P, et al. Stimulation of collagen synthesis in fibroblast cultures by a triterpene extracted from Centella asiatica. Connective Tissue Res 1990;24:107-20.

12. Tenni R, Zanaboni G, De Agostini MP, et al. Effect of the triterpenoid fraction of Centella asiatica on macromolecules of the connective matrix in human skin fibroblast cultures. Ital J Biochem 1988;37:69-77.

13. Shukla A, Rasik AM, Jain GK, et al. In vitro and in vivo wound healing activity of asiaticoside isolated from Centella asiatica. J Ethnopharmacol 1999;65:1-11.

14. Brinkhaus B, Linder M, Schuppan D, Hahn EG. Chemical, pharmacological and clinical profile of the East Asian medical plant Centella asiatica. Phytomedicine 2000;7:427-48.

15. Werbach MR, Murray MT. Botancial Influences on Illness. Tarzana, CA: Third Line Press, 2000, 143-7.

16. Kartnig T. Clinical applications of Centella asiatica (L) Urb. In Herbs, Spices, and Medicinal Plants: Recent Advances in Botany, Horticulture, and Pharmacology, vol. 3., Craker LE, Simon JE (eds). Phoenix, AZ: Oryx Press, 1986, 145-73.

17. Morisset R, Cote NG, Panisset JC, et al. Evaluation of the healing activity of hydrocotyle tincture in the treatment of wounds. Phytother Res 1987;1:117-21.

18. Bossé JP, Papillon J, Frenette G, et al. Clinical study of a new antikeloid drug. Ann Plastic Surg 1979;3:13-21.

19. Morisset R, Cote NG, Panisset JC, et al. Evaluation of the healing activity of hydrocotyle tincture in the treatment of wounds. Phytother Res 1987;1:117-21.

20. Kartnig T. Clinical applications of Centella asiatica (L) Urb. In Herbs, Spices, and Medicinal Plants: Recent Advances in Botany, Horticulture, and Pharmacology, vol. 3., Craker LE, Simon JE (eds). Phoenix, AZ: Oryx Press, 1986, 145-73.

21. Bossé JP, Papillon J, Frenette G, et al. Clinical study of a new antikeloid drug. Ann Plastic Surg 1979;3:13-21.

22. Shukla A, Rasik AM, Dhawan BN. Asiaticoside-induced elevation of antioxidant levels during acute wound healing. Phytotherapy Res 1999;13:50-4.

23. Shukla A, Rasik AM, Jain GK, et al. In vitro and in vivo wound healing activity of asiaticoside isolated from Centella asiatica. J Ethnopharmacol 1999;65:1-11.

24. Werbach MR, Murray MT. Botancial Influences on Illness. Tarzana, CA: Third Line Press, 2000, 143-7.

25. Brinkhaus B, Linder M, Schuppan D, Hahn EG. Chemical, pharmacological and clinical profile of the East Asian medical plant Centella asiatica. Phytomedicine 2000;7:427-48.

26. Cappelli R, Nicora M, Di Perri T. Use of extract of Ruscus aculeatus in venous disease in the lower limbs. Drugs Exp Clin Res 1988;14:277-83.

27. Brinkhaus B, Linder M, Schuppan D, Hahn EG. Chemical, pharmacological and clinical profile of the East Asian medical plant Centella asiatica. Phytomedicine 2000;7:427-48.

28. Duke JA. CRC Handbook of Medicinal Herbs. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 1985, 110-1.

29. Murray MT. The Healing Power of Herbs. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing, 1995, 173-83.

30. Murray MT. The Healing Power of Herbs. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing, 1995, 173-83.

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The information presented by Healthnotes is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires December 2019.