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Health Condition

Conjunctivitis and Blepharitis

  • Calendula

    Calendula has been traditionally used to treat eye inflammation.

    Dose:

    Refer to label instructions
    Calendula
    ×
     

    Several herbs have been traditionally used to treat eye inflammation. Examples include calendula, eyebright, chamomile, and comfrey. None of these herbs has been studied for use in conjunctivitis or blepharitis. As any preparation placed on the eye must be kept sterile, topical use of these herbs in the eyes should only be done under the supervision of an experienced healthcare professional.

  • Chamomile

    Chamomile has been traditionally used to treat eye inflammation.

    Dose:

    Refer to label instructions
    Chamomile
    ×
     

    Several herbs have been traditionally used to treat eye inflammation. Examples include calendula, eyebright, chamomile, and comfrey. None of these herbs has been studied for use in conjunctivitis or blepharitis. As any preparation placed on the eye must be kept sterile, topical use of these herbs in the eyes should only be done under the supervision of an experienced healthcare professional.

  • Comfrey

    Comfrey has been traditionally used to treat eye inflammation.

    Dose:

    Refer to label instructions
    Comfrey
    ×
     

    Several herbs have been traditionally used to treat eye inflammation. Examples include calendula, eyebright, chamomile, and comfrey. None of these herbs has been studied for use in conjunctivitis or blepharitis. As any preparation placed on the eye must be kept sterile, topical use of these herbs in the eyes should only be done under the supervision of an experienced healthcare professional.

  • Eyebright

    Eyebright has been traditionally used to treat eye inflammation.

    Dose:

    Refer to label instructions
    Eyebright
    ×

    Several herbs have been traditionally used to treat eye inflammation. Examples include calendula, eyebright, chamomile, and comfrey. None of these herbs has been studied for use in conjunctivitis or blepharitis. As any preparation placed on the eye must be kept sterile, topical use of these herbs in the eyes should only be done under the supervision of an experienced healthcare professional.1

  • Goldenseal

    Goldenseal contains berberine, an antibacterial constituent that has been clinically studied for eye infections.

    Dose:

    Refer to label instructions
    Goldenseal
    ×
     

    Goldenseal and Oregon grape contain the antibacterial constituent known as berberine. While topical use of berberine in eye drops has been clinically studied for eye infections,2 the use of the whole herbs has not been studied for conjunctivitis or blepharitis.

  • Oregon Grape

    Oregon grape contains berberine, an antibacterial constituent that has been clinically studied for eye infections.

    Dose:

    Refer to label instructions
    Oregon Grape
    ×
     

    Goldenseal and Oregon grape contain the antibacterial constituent known as berberine. While topical use of berberine in eye drops has been clinically studied for eye infections,3 the use of the whole herbs has not been studied for conjunctivitis or blepharitis.

  • Vitamin A

    Vitamin A deficiency has been reported in people with chronic conjunctivitis, but it is unknown whether vitamin A supplementation can help the condition.

    Dose:

    Refer to label instructions
    Vitamin A
    ×

    Vitamin A deficiency has been reported in people with chronic conjunctivitis.4 It is unknown whether vitamin A supplementation can prevent conjunctivitis or help people who already have the condition.

What Are Star Ratings
×
Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

References

1. Blumenthal M, Goldberg A, Brinckmann J. Herbal Medicine: Expanded Commission E Monographs.Newton, MA: Integrative Medicine Communications, 1999.

2. Babbar OP, Chatwal VK, Ray IB, et al. Effect of berberine chloride eye drops on clinically positive trachoma patients. Ind J Med Res 1982;76:83-8.

3. Babbar OP, Chatwal VK, Ray IB, et al. Effect of berberine chloride eye drops on clinically positive trachoma patients. Ind J Med Res 1982;76:83-8.

4. Rankov BG. Vitamin A and carotene concentration in serum in persons with chronic conjunctivitis and pterygium. Int J Vitam Nutr Res 1976;46:454-7 [in German].

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The information presented by Healthnotes is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. Self-treatment is not recommended for life-threatening conditions that require medical treatment under a doctor's care. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires December 2019.